WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA REPEATER COUNCIL
FREQUENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE
COORDINATION FORMS FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ)


If you're looking for 'general frequency coordination' information, please refer to the "W.P.R.C Coordination FAQ" web page.

 

W.P.R.C. Coordination Forms FAQ Index

1.   How do I fill out a repeater coordination application?
2.   How do I find available repeater frequency choices for my application?
3.   How do I transfer a cordination to someone else?
4.   How do I transfer a coordination to me?
5.   How do I change/modify/update my coordination?
6.   How do I change the callsign on my repeater?
7.   How do I change my repeater directory info?
8.   I've received my "Initial Coordination" papers. Now what?
9.   How do I terminate my coordination?
10. How many times can I apply for frequency coordination?
11. My application was denied because my minutes/seconds were greater than 59. Why?
12. How will I receive a reply to my coordination application?
13. What is the 'Backup Trustee' for?
14. I don't have my site yet. Can I still apply for coordination?
15. I lost my site. Now what?

16. Where do I send my application?
17. Where can I ask about the status of my application?

18-30 (RESERVED FOR FUTURE USE)

31. What forms do I need to submit to apply for repeater frequency coordination?
32. Where do I get these forms?
33. What do all the fields on the repeater coordination form mean?
34. What forms do I need to submit to apply for *link* frequency coordination?
35. What do all the fields on the *link* coordination form mean?
36. What's the difference between a repeater and a link?
37. How do I determine my ERP?
38. How do I determine my HAAT?
39. Why do I need to submit my application on paper?
40. Can I fill out an application online?
41. Can I email my application?
42. Why was my application denied?
43. How long will it take to process my coordination?
44. Why does it take so long to get a frequency coordination?
45. How long until I can expect a reply?
46. Can I just guess at the figures on my application?
47. Is membership in W.P.R.C. required to apply for frequency coordination?
48. Where do I get a list for the valid data for the "NOTES" field?


1. How do I fill out a repeater coordination application?
Download the forms from the WPRC website at "WPRC Frequency Coordination Forms", print them out, and submit them. Note that
only the actual 'Frequency Coordination Application - Form WPRC-100 ' and an optional 'Repeater Directory' - FORM WPRC-105' need be submitted.
A 'Link Coordination form -FORM WPRC-101' should be submitted if you repeater will have an RF control link.

In particular, forms 'WPRC-102' and 'WPRC-103', are worksheets, and do not need to be submitted. They are for your use only to assist you
in completing the 'WPRC-100' and 'WPRC-101' forms.

The completed forms should then be mailed to the USPS mailing address found on the "WPRC Home Page".
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2. How do I find available repeater frequency choices for my application?
It takes a lot of research on some bands, and not so much on others. Here are some useful tools that you can use to find the information that
may need.

(1) The 'WPRC Frequency Selection Tool' web page will help you will find valid frequencies for repeater operation in WPA. Print out the
appropriate list (note that some of the lists for higher bands can be quite lengthy).

(2) The 'WPRC Repeater Directory' will provide you with a listing of coordinated repeaters in WPA. Print this out and use it as a baseline with
which to start your research.

(3) You will also want to review a list of repeaters that are located in adjacent areas serviced by other repeater councils that fall within the coverage
area of your proposed repeater. Links to their repeaters can be found at:

OH: http://www.oarc.com
WV: No published info. See http://www.sera.org/cord.html
MD: http://www.tmarc.org/index_files/page0002. html
EPA: http://www.arcc-inc.org/arc-fdbas.html
NY: (Central): http://www.unyrepco.org/
WNY/Southern Ontario: http://www.wnysorc.org/repeaters.php

Note: No claim is made by WPRC as to the accuracy of these lists. Each is updated by their respective frequency coordination councils.

Some other tools that you might find useful are:
US Geological Survey Maps: These maps display actual height of terrain around a specific location (major city, land mark, etc). They usually
are available in specific grids. Thus you might need more than one map to plot your proposed repeater coverage area, and distance between
other repeaters. This is the method that we used prior to the use of computers to find height, distances, etc between various locations. It is still a
very useful tool.
ARRL Travel Plus For Repeater CD-ROM: It is available from your favorite ham radio dealer, or from the ARRL. Note that its data is usually
not the current repeater data due to the time frame required for publication.
Online Repeater Databases: are available on the internet. Note that the data is usually not the current data as most repeater data is considered,
by their respective repeater councils, as copyright material. Most of these web based tools require input from either repeater owners, users, or
just anyone. If you want to obtain a list of them, use your favorite search engine to search for 'repeater databases'. Use these databases at
your own risk as WPRC cannot guarantee their accuracy.
Note that WPRC does not allow its information to be included in such listings, as it is
considered by WPRC as copyright material, and is not be used without written permission from WPRC.
Distance Calculators: are available on the internet. Use your favorite search engine to search for 'distance calculators' to find one that is suitable
for your use.
Delorme's Street Atlas USA can be used to help them in determining distances between locations. It is available from a local computer retaler,
online book seller.
Use these distance calculators at your own risk
.

4) From a location within your primary coverage area (close to where your repeater will be located), monitor these frequencies for
activity. If you can hear a repeater, that frequency will not be suitable for your operation, and can be scratched off the list of available
repeater frequencies. Alternately, try to access the repeaters listed. Again, if you can hear them, scratch the frequency off your list.

5) If the repeater is within the following distance from your proposed site, also scratch off the frequencies above and below the one they are
operating on.

This applies to NBFM, Analog repeaters only (most repeaters), for digital repeaters, please request the appropriate chart.
For 25 kHz adjacents, 20 miles.
For 20 kHz adjacents, 30 miles.
For 15 kHz adjacents, 50 miles.
For 12.5 kHz adjacents, 80 miles.

For example, if your band of interest is 2M, and the band segment uses 15 kHz spacing, and you know a location is within 40 miles of you,
that is less than the 50 mile criteria so the actual frequency plus the frequencies above and below it would not be available. If you're
not sure of the mileage, guess conservatively. This will only get you 'in the ballpark' with your frequency choices.

Once you've completed the above steps, you should have a list. If you only have a few frequencies on your list, that's not good. It means
nearly all frequencies are used in your area and there may be none available for your operation. Select the ones that appear to be most open
and apply for those. Odds are there will be stations you did not hear from your service area, but would cause mutual interference to users
between the two stations.

If you have a large number of frequencies left on your list, try to narrow down the most open ones by repeating the above process (using
your 'short list' as a starting point this time) from a better location - perhaps even at your proposed repeater site.

Once you have selected the top three frequencies, you can list them as your prospective choices on your application.

If those three are denied, you can try three more, but each time the odds of finding a frequency that can be coordinated for your location is lower.

In some cases, particularly on bands such as 10 Meter and 2 Meters, there may be no available frequencies in your area. If this is the case
your only choices are to abandon your project, move your project to another band (2 Meters is NOT the only band there is), or colaborate
with someone else in your area who has a coordinated repeater on the air.
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3. How do I transfer a coordination to someone else?
Fill out form 'WPRC-100-Application for Frequency Coordination' and check the 'TRUSTEE CHANGE' box at the top, list the new
trustee (the person who will be responsiblefor the coordination in the future) under the 'REPEATER TRUSTEE' area. YOU, as the
EXISTING TRUSTEE, must sign and submit the form to WPRC. The new trustee will then receive a new coordination form in the mail.

The other areas of the form may be left blank if there is no change in Location, Frequency, or Features.
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4. How do I transfer a coordination to me?
You must have the existing trustee follow the procedure outlined in FAQ 3. ONLY the existing trustee may modify his coordination.
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5. How do I change/modify/ update my coordination?
Fill out form 'WPRC-100 -Application for frequency Coordination' and check the 'COORDINATION MODIFICATION REQUEST'
box at the top, list the changes on the form, then sign and submit it to WPRC. You will then receive a new coordination form in the mail.

Some areas of the form may be left blank if there is no change to the data.
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6. How do I change the callsign on my repeater?
Fill out form 'Application for Frequency Coordination - WPRC Form 100' and check the 'COORDINATION MODIFICATION REQUEST'
box at the top, list the new call on the form, then sign and submit it to WPRC. You will then receive a new coordination form in the mail.
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7. How do I change my repeater directory info?
Fill out form 'Repeater Directory Submission - WPRC Form 105', sign and submit it to WPRC. Your information will be updated in the
database and reflected in the next update of the appropriate Repeater Directories.
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8. I've received my "Initial Coordination" papers. Now what?
Notify WPRC, via USPS Mail or via eMail sent to "wprcemail", when your repeater is on the air as-coordinated.
This is called the 'On Air Notice'. This will start your 90 days on-air testing period. At the end of the on-air-testing period, if no issues have
arrisen, you will receive your 'Final Coordination'.
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9. How do I terminate my coordination?
Send a letter to WPRC indicating your desire to terminate your coordination. Make sure to note the frequency, callsign, and 'Coordination
Number' if you have it.
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10. How many times can I apply for frequency coordination?
There is no limit to the number of times you may apply, but please keep the number reasonable and do not apply again if you have a
pending coordination item. You should note that each time you apply, your chances of receiving coordination lower, as your prospective
choices are less open from your own research.

While it has never been a problem, excessive 'gunshot' applications may be grounds for dismissal of your application without action.
What are 'gunshot' applications? They are applications for which no research was performed, and random frequencies were merely
submitted by the applicant, often in ascending frequency order, and often not even meeting the bandplan or available channel list.
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11. My application was denied because my minutes/seconds were greater than 59. Why?
Neither Minutes nor Seconds can be greater than 59 in the coordinate system. When this happens, most often the problem is that you
used "decimal degrees" or "decimal minutes" on your application. Coordinates MUST be submitted in the Degrees-Minutes- Seconds
format using the NAD83 coordinate system - the same one used by the Federal Communications Commission in most radio services.
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12. How will I receive a reply to my coordination application?
Approved requests are sent in the form of an "Initial Coordination" form sent via USPS Mail. Please note that this will often take 60-90
days from the date your application was received.

Denials are sent via eMail (if available), and via USPS if no eMail is available. Please note that email replies will be received much faster.

Why so long? Please see "Coordination FAQ 18".
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13. What is the 'Backup Trustee' for?
The backup trustee is used in case we need to reach someone responsible for your repeater, when you are no longer available, for whatever
the reason.
'No longer available' is defined, for the purposes of the backup trustee, as not responsive to mailed requests or status updates, having
a USPS address that is returned, or if you've become a 'Silent Key'.
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14. I don't have my site yet. Can I still apply for coordination?
Coordination is based on a number of factors, and the most important is the location of your proposed station. Without a specific location,
distances to other systems cannot be calculated. Your repeater is coordinated for a specific location, not a general city or region.
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15. I lost my site. Now what?
You must apply for a 'Modification Of Coordination' using Form WPRC-100' when you obtain a new site. Please note that there is no
guarantee the same frequency, or ANY frequency, will be available for your new site. While minor site changes have the best chance of
approval, there are factors that could result in your application being denied, such as moving from an area that shadows another repeater's
coverage area into an area that has no such shadow. Again, minor site changes have the best chance of approval. Try to find a site with
similar elevation or lower, and as close to the previous site as possible.
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16. Where do I send my application?
To the USPS address found on the "WPRC Home Page".
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17. Where can I ask about the status of my application?
You can send an eMail to "wprcemail", or by USPS mail to the address found on the "WPRC Main Page".
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18-30 (RESERVED FOR FUTURE USE)
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31. What forms do I need to submit to apply for repeater frequency coordination?
At minimum, the form "WPRC-100".
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32. Where do I get these forms?
You can "Download The Forms" from our web page, or request the forms package via USPS mail sent to our USPS address found
on the "WPRC Main Page".
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33. What do all the fields on the repeater coordination form mean?
This is not going to be a short answer.

The blocks at the top indicate the nature of the application (New, Modification, Etc.) and should be self-explanitory. Check the box that
most closely matches the reason for your application.

Bandwidth:   Check the bandwidth appripriate to your proposed repeater (most are NBFM).

Mode used:   Simply the most used as listed in the examples.

Repeater Callsign:   The callsign that will be transmitted on your proposed repeater.

Frequency Choices:   The three frequency choices you desire. (See FAQ 2 for how to select these)

Site Location:   Contains information about your proposed repeater's location.

Latitude/Longitude:   The coordinates of your transmitting antenna in NAD83, Degrees-Minutes-Seconds format rounded to the nearest second.

Street address:   The street address of your proposed repeater IF there is one.

City/County/ State:   The City/County/ State of your proposed repeater's location.

AGL:   Your antenna's height 'Above Ground Level' at the center of radiation.

AMSL:   The Ground Elevation of your proposed repeater's site 'Above Mean Sea Level'.

HAAT:   Your antenna's 'Height Above Average Terrain' (see form WPRC-102 for how to get this).

ERP:   The 'Effective Radiated Power' of your station (see form WPRC-103 for how to get this).

Access/Linking Features:   The features your repeater has and means of accessing it.

Features:   The 'NOTES' column in the ARRL and similar Repeater Directories. This is not required for coordination.

Access:   The means used to access your repeater in addition to the frequency.

Linking/Control Frequencies:   The means used to control your repeater over the air. This is not required for coordination.

Projected Service Area:   The approximate distance you expect from your proposed repeater.

Trustee and Sponsor:   The trustee contact information for the coordination.
Note that the 'Sponsor' is now only submitted on the 'Repeater Directory Submission' form.

Trustee Name: The actual nume of the person responsible for maintaining the coordination.

Callsign: The Amateur Radio callsign of the person responsible for maintaining the coordination.

Backup Trustee Callsign: The Amateur Radio callsign of the backup trustee (see FAQ 13 for the reason for this). This is not required
for coordination, but is highly recommended.

eMail:   The email address used for correspondence related to your application.

Phone (Home/Work):   The phone number used for correspondence related to your application. In most cases, this will not be needed, but
at least one of these is required for your application.

Trustee Signature:   The signature of the person submitting the application. This should be the same as the Trustee Name above.

Date:  The date the application was completed.

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34. What forms do I need to submit to apply for *link* frequency coordination?
Form WPRC-101.
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35. What do all the fields on the link coordination form mean?
TBA - see "FAQ 33" for now.
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36. What's the difference between a repeater and a link?
Repeaters are point-to-multipoint (usually site to user) stations, while links are typically point-to-point stations that connect stations
from fixed locations.
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37. How do I determine my ERP ?
Use the form WPRC-103 worksheet. This form need not be submitted with your application.
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38. How do I determine my site's HAAT?
There are two acceptable ways of determining HAAT.
1, Use the form WPRC-102 worksheet. This form need not be submitted with your application.
2, Use the FCC's online HAAT calculator. This process requires conversion of measurements from feet to meters.
Go Here to understand how to use the online HAAT calculator.
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39. Why do I need to submit my application on paper?
All applications must have a paper trail and a signature of the applicant for legal reasons.
WPRC is not set up to accept any form except paper applications..
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40. Can I fill out an application online?
No. WPRC does not have online applications for the reasons outlined in FAQ 39.
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41. Can I email my application?
No. WPRC does not accept email applications for the reasons outlined in FAQ 39.
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42. Why was my application denied?
The reason for the denial was listed on the reply you received.

Applications are denied for one of the following reasons, in order of 'popularity' :
(1). Another station is coordinated at a location that would cause mutual interference if your station were in operation. This may be on the
same frequency or adjacent frequencies or does not meet the spacing requirements required under WPRC's or surrounding coordinator' s
guidelines.
(2). You requested a frequency that does not meet the "WPRC Spectrum Bandplan"
(3). You requested a frequency that is not on a standard repeater frequency. See the 'WPRC Frequency Selection Tool' web page for
more information.
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43. How long will it take to process my coordination?
Please see Coordination FAQ 7 .
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44. Why does it take so long to get a frequency coordination?
Please see Coordination FAQ. 8
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45. How long until I can expect a reply?
Please see Coordination FAQ 17 .
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46. Can I just guess at the figures on my application?
No. Your figures must be accurate. If your figures are not accurate, and an issue arises, your coordination will be nullified due to
inaccurate data. In addition, any errors in the data submitted will yield bad distance calculations which may result in you
being denied coordination when your site would otherwise allow your coordination, or worse could result in your coordination
being approved for a location other than the location of your actual operation. This would in effect be no different than having no
coordination at all.
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47. Is membership in W.P.R.C. required to apply for coordination?
Membership is not required, but is encouraged. See WPRC Membership Application web page for more information.
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48. Where do I get a list for the valid data for the "NOTES" field?
Please see the "Repeater Features" web page for more information.
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--- End of Coordination Forms FAQ ---

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Edited: June 13, 2012